Dare I ask…?

I have been wondering (and dreading the answer) ‘Can you still have a few drinks while trying to be fructose free?’ It looks like, thankfully, the answer is YES!

but

It does come down to drinking in moderation and making an informed choice about which type of alcohol is best to have. I have found information about different types of drinks and the sugar amount in each so …. it is time to face the facts!!

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✔️ Beer 

Beer does contain a lot of sugar, but in the form of maltose which can be easily metabolised by our  bodies.

Maltose is fructose free.

Beer is  a good choice.

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✔️ White Wine

White wine contains very minimal amounts of fructose.

It is the fructose in the grapes that ferments to become alcohol, leaving the finished product quite low in sugar.

White table wines have around 1.5 grams of sugar per serving

The dryer the wine the less fructose in it.

Some white wines are a good choice.

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✔️ Red Wine

Like white wine, red wine also contains very minimal amounts of fructose.

Red table wines have less than 1 gram of sugar per serving.

Again the dryer the wine the less fructose in it.

Red wine is lower in fructose than white wine making it the better choice.

Most red wines are a good choice.

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❌ Champagne, sparkling wines and desert wines

Though similar in the fermentation process of red and white wine champagne, sparkling wines and desert wines tend to retain quite a lot of the fructose from the grapes.

Dessert wines, as an example, can have as many as 8 grams of sugar per serving. Sugar is added to these wines to create a sweet flavor.

These are really not a great choice to have.

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❌ Ciders

A single pint (568ml bottle) of cider contained almost as much sugar as the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends should be an average person’s daily limit. It has a staggering 20.5g of sugar – 5 teaspoons of sugar!!

The range of sugar amount can be from more than 8 g/100mL to 2.4 g/100mL depending on the brand.

On the whole ciders are not a good option.

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Spirits and Mixers

✔️ Spirits: Dry spirits like gin, vodka and whiskey are very low in fructose.

BUT

It is the mixers that are added to the spirits that are loaded with sugar. A can of tonic for example has 32g of sugar which equates to 8 teaspoons of sugar!!

Mixed drinks, such as margaritas, pina coladas and daiquiris, can contain over 30 grams of sugar or 7 teaspoons of sugar.

Spirits can be a good choice but watch the mixers!

Sarah Wilson.A few ideas from Sarah Wilson – I quit sugar

Tips for sugar-free boozing.

  • Alcohol-free is always going to be your safest bet.
  • Soda or plain mineral water with a squeeze of lemon or lime is surprisingly satisfying. We love asking the bartender to jazz it up with a slice of cucumber or some fresh mint.
  • Clear spirits like vodka and gin mixed with soda water and fresh lemon and lime are probably the lowest sugar alcoholic drinks you’re going to be able to get.
  • Gin, soda water and fresh cucumber is one of our favourites. So refreshing.
  • STAY AWAY FROM SOFT DRINKS AND TONIC WATER… they are loaded with sugar!

A FEW WORDS OF CAUTION…

A few more words of caution before you take a tipple.

  • Alcohol still has a multitude of metabolism and health issues that come with excessive consumption, not to mention it’s an addictive substance.

  • Although most alcohol is low in fructose, it’s still very high in empty calories.

  • Only ever drink spirits with soda water. Mixers, including tonic water, are full of sugar – about 8–10 teaspoons in one tall glass. Ditto fruit juices.

  • A beer is equivalent in calories to a sausage roll. Two glasses of Champagne are the equivalent of about 1/5 of your daily energy intake. Yeah, hurts to hear!

  • Remember, when it comes to alcoholic drinks, once you have too many it’s very hard to make sensible food choices. You’re far more likely to reach for that slice of cake after a few drinks than you would be sober. Just something to keep in mind.

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You can drink alcohol while you are reducing your fructose levels. It all come down to the choices you make and the amount you drink. I think Sarah has some great ideas of sugar free drinking and I will be giving some of them a go.

On a personal note I have noticed since I have reduced my fructose levels my alcohol tolerance level has majorly dropped.  

So now that the fact have been faced….. we can all enjoy a relaxing drink which can be low in fructose if we choose carefully and drink in moderation.

cheers

Feature image – why universe.com

 

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